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From Worker to Employer: Do You Have What it Takes to Be the Boss?

The thought of what it’s like to be a boss would have crossed every worker’s mind at some point in time. Find out if you have the right qualities to be a great employer.

You’re in your mid-career stage. You’ve worked hard, gained a lot of professional experience under your belt, and diligently attended many courses to expand your skills. You’re good at what you do and comfortable in your current role.

Now you’re asking yourself: Is it time for me to start something on my own? Should I become a boss?

So, is it time for you to step up?

There’s no specific timeline to becoming your own boss. The right time is when you’re ready. Becoming a boss is a whole different league than being an employee. One key difference? You’re responsible for everything now. 

Sure, doing your job well might mean that you’ve achieved a high mastery of your profession and maybe a sign that you’re ready to take on more. 

But does it necessarily mean that you’re ready to employ, rather than be employed?

Keen to start the next phase of your career but wondering how to do it? Register to speak to a WSG Career Officer today!

Ask any employer you know if being the person in charge is an easy task and, often, the answer will be no. 

However, you’d already know that things aren’t going to be easy, but nothing ventured nothing gained right?

But here’s the problem: How do you know you’re ready for boss mode if you haven’t done it before? 

Signs you’re ready to become a boss

How you manage a company will vary depending on the industry, but here are some signs that may indicate that you’re ready to step up:

1. You always put your team first

As a boss, you’ll be responsible for the employees that work for you. A good leader always understands the challenges that his or her employees face. 

A good boss deserves a standing ovation from employees.

When an effective leader sees a problem, he or she would lead the way to make things work in the best way possible. 

2. You walk the talk

Actions speak louder than words. If you’ve always been a disciplined employee, then you should be even more so as a boss. Even if you’re the owner of the company, you need to abide by the same company rules and regulations that you set for your employees. 

Even the boss-like pose couldn’t save his professional image.

For example, if the company’s dress code is office attire, having you turn up at work in shorts and a t-shirt isn’t going to reflect well on you as a leader. Your employees may equate your cavalier dress sense as not being serious in your role as a boss.

3. You are impartial and neutral

If you’re the sort who has never taken sides and avoids favouring one clique over another as an employee, maybe you have the makings of a fair employer. As a boss, you must be impartial to any conflict situations between your employees. 

Happy employees, happy boss.

No matter if it’s friction between a senior and junior employee, a good leader would listen to both sides of the story before finding the best possible way to resolve it. Knowing that you’re a fair boss may give your employees more confidence to perform better at their jobs.

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4. People trust and respect you

As the saying goes: respect is earned and not given. 

“This chart here explains why mutual respect is important,” said the respectful boss.

As a boss, it is important that your employees respect you for your positive traits and not just because you’re paying their wages. 

Read More: Leadership Qualities: Signs of a Good Leader in Times of Change

One good example that shows your employees highly respect and trust you is when they feel comfortable talking to you about any work issues or personal matters that are affecting them at work. 

This means that they value how you perceive them at work and do not want to disappoint you with a bad performance.

5. Less blaming, more problem-solving

Sometimes things may go wrong at work. When such a situation happens, you’re always quick to respond and rectify the problem. If you’re a problem-solving employee, chances are you’d make a good solutions-driven employer. 

Read More: What it Takes to Lead in a Time of Crisis and Disruption

The responsible boss would always focus on finding solutions rather than putting the blame on employees. This would reflect your integrity as a leader of the company with your willingness to face challenges together with your employees.

OK to be ambitious, but do your research

In your career journey, it’s good to think big, but even more important to be ready for what lies ahead. If you’re not happy at work, even after you’ve taken steps to improve the situation, perhaps it’s time to look for other opportunities. If you need professional advice, speak to a WSG career officer

Here is a list of relevant articles that we’ve compiled that will help you gain more insights on making the transition to becoming not just a boss, but a great employer. Good luck in your career journey!

Starting Your Own Business: Learn From These Singaporeans

Changing Careers: How 3 S’poreans Paved the Way to Success

Fast-Paced Company: Scoot’s Senior Staff Shares His Learning Points

6 S’pore Employers Share What Impresses Them Most at Job Interviews

Wang Lei: Getai Singer to Online Fish Seller, and How He Pivoted During a Crisis

What Virgil Abloh’s Life Teaches on Trying New Career Challenges (and Why Mid-Career Internships Are OK)

Business Heroes: CARRO’s Boss on Pursuing his Passion and Talent He’s Looking Out For

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